Tag Archives: Syrah

Revisiting Trivento’s Amado Sur Red Blend

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Recently I had the urge and opportunity to revisit an Argentinian blend that originally caught my eye two years ago. This wine regularly makes the Wine Spectator Smart Buy list and has rated between 88 – 91 points for each vintage over the last 7 years. Pretty good for a wine that averages $15.00 a bottle.  Even more so when one comes across coupons and sales! My 2012 came in at $11.99 and I’ll be the first to admit I’d probably pay twice that much.

Prior to reviewing my 2010 post I was happy to find many similarities as I popped the cork and experienced this Malbec, Bonarda, Syrah blend.  My 2012 notes:

On the nose; dark fruit [blackberry], leather, wood [oak] in the background. Fruit moving forward as it opened. Earthiness gathering strength at about the 30 minute mark.

On the palate; black pepper, cocoa and dark fruits that intensified as the wine opened. Soft velvety tannins noted at the 30-40 minute mark.

Below you’ll find my 2010 review of the Amado Sur where I asked the question: Can a wine make you feel warm and cozy?  I am glad to report that two years later the velvety 2012 vintage felt like home. Searching for a great value? This may be the one.  ¡SALUD!

Warm and Cozy with Trivento’s

 2010 Amado Sur from Argentina

The luck of the red blends was with us again recently when I finally sat down to experience this delicious wine.  As I’ve asked before; can a wine make you feel warm and cozy? My answer is YES and for me the Amado Sur falls into this category.

I was drawn to this wine in our store because of its varietal blend; 80% Malbec, 10% Bonarda and 10% Syrah. Being a fan of all three led me to believe that I was going to enjoy their coming together and boy did I ever. I seem to not be the only one because it is flying off our shelves. I can take credit for a few bottles myself plus the happy returning customers that I have recommended Amado Sur to, but not the one to two cases we are going through weekly. So much so that we just ordered 10 cases for an end-cap display.  With the added benefit of a sale price and coupons we may just be ordering even more soon.

Trivento information from Banfi Importers: When in the mid-1990s Concha y Toro, Chile’s leading wine producer, announced its successful purchase a collection of vineyards (now accounting for 3,185 acres) in the Mendoza region of neighboring Argentina, there was little doubt on either side of the Andes that change was in the air. Wind is the agent of change, so it was only fitting that the new venture was named “ Trivento” (Three Winds), a whimsical reference to three winds that sweep through Mendoza and are such a distinguishing feature of the region’s climate and environment.

Upon decanting the first thing I noticed was its rich aroma which included; dark fruit, caramel and an undertone of wood.  As it breathed I also noted; black pepper, blackberry, black olive and oak on the nose.  Once poured its bright garnet color, more so along the edges of the glass, brought attention to the lovely slow-moving legs. Both of these I believe a cause of the wines alcohol level.  Additionally noted on the palate were; chocolate, a sweetening of the wine as it opened and what I listed as violet but in actuality may have been anise or licorice.

Winemaker notes: A deep red wine with dark blue tones and aromas of dark fruit combining with notes of black pepper, anise, cinnamon and chocolate. Lush flavors of plums and berries give way to velvety tannins and a persistent and pleasant finish.

We paired the Amado Sur with an aged cheddar cheese to start followed by pepperoni pizza. It worked very well with both, making the cheddar explode with flavor and the pizza even more spicy. I am looking forward to enjoying this wine again and again and even more so sharing it with family, friends and customers. ¡SALUD!

Price range: $12-17.00

Wine Spectator Review:

A floral red, with juicy blackberry, raspberry and plum notes supported by medium tannins, as the grippy finish unfolds with hints of mulled spice and licorice. Smart Buy. 90 Points.

Nathan Wesley – Wine Spectator – October, 2012
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Bastille Day, French Wine and Whole Foods Market

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Happy Bastille Day!

 

July 14th the annual La Fête Nationale celebration in France or Bastille Day as it is mostly known in English-speaking countries is upon us once again and we have another holiday to drink wine to. To quote myself from Bastille Day 2012:   let’s drink some French wine!

 

Ventoux Soleil des Garrigues

Ventoux Soleil des Garrigues

Today’s choice, the Ventoux Soleil des Garrigues 2012, comes to us via Whole Foods Market Summer Top 10 program.  On-line information from Wiki tells us:

Ventoux AOC (formerly Côtes du Ventoux AOC) is a wine-growing AOC in the southeastern region of the Rhône wine region of France, where the wines are produced in 51 communes of the Vaucluse département along the lower slopes of the Ventoux mountain and at the foot of the Vaucluse Mountains. Archeological discoveries of wine making equipment have dated that wine has been produced in the area at least since around 30 AD.

This Grenache, Syrah, Cinsault  blend is what I would describe and recommend as a perfect Summer red: light bodied and fruity. Also great for fans of Pinot Noirs and even Beaujolais.

Whole Foods describes it as; aromatic with black fruit, spices and sweet cherry. Minerality and sweet anise show in this easy-to-sip Red blend. Soft tannins gently round out the finish.

BASTILLE DAYThis well-balanced blend of fruit, spice and pepper is a great way to not only celebrate Bastille Day and the warm days ahead but dare I say also a match for upcoming turkey holiday meals.

The year is flying by and hopefully the Ventoux Soleil des Garrigues, priced at $9.99 will not be “gobbled” up by November. Sorry I couldn’t resist 🙂

¡SALUD!

 

Wine Discovery of the Week – DiamAndes 2012 Perlita Malbec-Syrah

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Diamandes Perlita @WCW2014One of the perks of my job as a Wine Buyer is that I am regularly offered new products to taste and carry at our store. Of course these visits by our distributors can go either way. But every once in a while a wine leaves its mark. That is exactly what happened as I discovered this pearl.

Among four or five wines tasted including high-end Pinot Noirs and a unoaked Chardonnay, the Perlita  [little pearl in spanish] 2012 Malbec-Syrah blend from Argentina was for me the instant hit.

 

From Wines of Argentina:

It’s in 1999 that Michel Rolland along with 6 other Bordeaux winemakers founded the Clos de los Siete : an innovative and unique concept : More than 850 hectares divided in 7 plots, each one with its own winery. The vineyard is located in Mendoza, in the heart of the Uco valley, one of the best quality vineyard areas in Argentina. In 2005, the Bonnie family, owners of the renowned Grand Cru Classé Château Malartic-Lagravière, and its neighboring Pessac-Léognan Château Gazin Rocquencourt became part of this Argentinean adventure. Through the purchase, along with their partners, of a single estate of 130 hectares within the Clos de Los Siete, Bodega DiamAndes was born.

The 2012 Perlita is 80% Malbec 20% Syrah harvested April 3rd-15th and aged [100%] 10 months in french oak. Having never experienced such a blend I was very impressed with how each varietal improved upon each other. The Malbec spice balanced out the Syrah richness of fruit.

My notes;

Deep dark rich burgundy purple in color. At 14.5% ALC I was surprised to not see much legs on the glass at first but somehow they seemed to develop and linger in mere minutes. Dark fruit and tobacco on the nose. On the palate; good and noticeable acidity, fruit forward [blackberry] yet balanced with spice [vanilla]. Medium plus body with medium tannins.

As you can probably imagine this wine is now sitting proudly on our shelves at Whole Foods Market North Miami.  I am pretty sure I would have brought this wine in anyway but the deciding factor was its price. Usually available under $20 it is presently on-sale for $13.99. I will excitedly be introducing this wine to our customers who tend to lean towards fruit forward but well-balanced wines. Having bought  a couple of bottles for our cellar just last week: it may already be time to replenish.  ¡SALUD!  To discovering the pearls in life!

 

 

Technical info from Bodega Diamandes:

130 hectares
Terroir: Clay and sand with a a large quantity of pebbles. In the Uco Valley, in the foothills of the Andes Mountains, at an altitude of 1100 m.
Planting density: 5 500 plants per ha
Vine care: Vertical trellising, green harvest, handed leaf thinning
Harvest: Handed picking with small crates, cooling in cold room, handed double sorting. No crushing
Vinification: Entirely gravity-operated process. Gentle extractions with fractional pumping over; slow, fermentation kinetics at low temperatures.
64 small temperature-controlled stainless steel vats (isolated with a double jacket). Unique in South America !
Consultant Oenologist: Michel Rolland

Domaine Chante Cigale: 2004 Chateauneuf-Du-Pape

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labelAlfio Moriconi Selection Domaine Chante Cigale:  2004 Chateauneuf-Du-Pape

Following through on one of my two official new year resolutions for 2013, I am doing my best not to hoard good wines for future imbibing but enjoying them in the present.

After enjoying and writing about California’s Chappallet Cabernet Sauvignon in my last post we cross the ocean to France and their Chateauneuf-Du-Pape appellation.  I must admit that this wine has probably been sitting in our cellar for over a year and although aging befits this type of wine it most definitely falls into my STOP HOARDING category. A lovely gift from dear wine loving friends and neighbors, it was an easy decision when considering my ENJOY NOW choices.

Interesting notes about this wine that I discovered:

-The Domaine Chante Cigale has been in family ownership since the 19th century.

-“Chante” means singing, and “cigale” is cicada.

-The domaine owns 40 hectares of planting area for red grapes and  5 hectares for green [or white] grapes.

-Chateauneuf-Du-Pape means New Castle of the Pope, dating back to the 14th century and referring to Pope Clement V.

-This appellation allows an unusual long list of grape varietals, thirteen with as many as 18 listed in the AOC documentation.

-Up until the 1920’s wines from Chateauneuf-Du-Pape were blended with others from the general area of Avignon.  Between 1929 and 1936 Chateauneuf-Du-Pape became one of France’s first official appellations for wine.

An Alfio Moriconi Selection?

Some of you may have noted this designation on the label and or description. At first I couldn’t find much information or reference to Mr. Moriconi at Chante Cigale but as it turns out Alfio Moriconi  is the Vice President of European Wine Sales & Imports at Total Wine.  His selections are at times noted on the label itself not only because of the large quantities of wine they buy from producers but also to  draw attention to the implied quality of his choices.  To some degree I see it as a way of private labeling their products and making them available as such only through Total Wine. Pretty good marketing idea when you have that kind of buying power if you ask me.

My notes:

This blend of 60% Grenache, 20% Syrah, 10% Mourvedre, 10% Cinsault was a rich dark burgundy color with some brown when decanted.  I was concerned at first because the upper part of the cork practically crumbled at opening due to its dryness, but luckily the lower half stayed together and was a beautiful moist sight to see as it was pulled from the bottle.  On the nose I noted this Chateauneuf-Du-Pape was; delicate dark fruit forward and listed examples of fig and guava which may have to do with my tropical background. Spicy and fruity combined. On the palate I detected a tawny dark fruit taste, a bold wine with leather, pepper and herbs coming through and little wood.

At 40 minutes I noted this wine had become much smoother with fruit becoming somewhat more delicate and distinguishable. At the 60 minute mark the fruit had come forward even more so with spiciness appreciated on the lingering finish.  My last observation on this wine came at the 90 minute mark when I noted: OPEN! And yes in capitals with an exclamation mark 🙂  I can see this medium bodied wine easily being decanted for an hour before being served to better appreciate its various flavors and smooth tannins.

We thoroughly enjoyed this wine and now I find myself thinking of a reason to invite our neighbors over again. Not that we need one really since we love sharing new wine discoveries every chance we get. CHEERS to wine loving friends everywhere and ¡SALUD!

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APOTHIC RED – 2010 Winemakers Blend

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2010 Winemakers Blend

It’s taken me awhile but I finally broke down and tried this very popular wine. Similar to my experience with Cupcake which I recently wrote about; I must have an aversion to well marketed, popular and affordable vino.

Priced in the $8.00-$12.00 range it is usually available somewhere on sale.  In our store it always moves no matter the price. Its fans appreciate this wine whether on sale or not but of course we tend to sellout at the lower price points.  We easily go through 1-2 cases a week without highlighting it on an end-cap. Stock it, they will come 🙂

I would compare the APOTHIC to similar products from CUPCAKE [Red Velvet] and MENAGE A TROIS [Red Blend].  All with similar price points and marketed at the same audience if you ask me.  The audience [?]: first time wine drinkers, women, appreciators of sweet [but not too sweet] red wine, and older people to give some examples.  In my experience if I had to narrow it down to two of these I would say; new to wine drinkers along with the older population [including my parents] tend to love it.  Just imagine an older woman just beginning to try wine and I would say BINGO if asked for advice by a customer.

But admittedly that is narrowing the scope of its marketing and success. I have plenty of younger customers who have tried this wine and come back for more, male and female, excited that they found an affordable wine they and their partners can share.  For me the obvious common denominator is the sugar level or sweetness of these wines. It makes the drinking experience a lot more palpable to many.

As I decanted or poured from the bottle in this case,  I immediately noticed an earthiness on the nose that made me think there was ZIN! in there which of course there was. As a fan I was just glad to detect it so quickly.  The Zinfandel descriptors pretty much stop there though.  Also detected on the nose was a caramel [sweet] undertone.  Upon tasting,  the caramel really exploded along with vanilla and other spices.  I also noted grape sour pop as in the lollipop. I kept almost recognizing a flavor and yet it continuously escaped me. This went on for a while, as my drinking partner kept saying how much they were enjoying this wine, until I finally blurted out ROOT BEER! and they simultaneously said SASSAFRAS!!  The more likely culprit would probably be Cream Soda thanks to the aforementioned vanilla/caramel flavors.

Would I buy this wine regularly? Probably not. But once again I now understand its popularity and can easily recommend it to others who I know will not only appreciate it but make it their “go to” choice on a regular basis. ¡SALUD!

From the winemaker:

Inspired by “Apotheca,” a mysterious place where wine was blended and stored in 13th century Europe, the wines of Apothic are truly unique in style and taste.

Our winemaker Boyd Morrison crafts bold, captivating Apothic blends by using only the most distinctive California grapes. From vintage to vintage, Boyd lets the character and flavor of the individual varietals guide the shape of each blend.

to create Apothic Red using the most distinctive grapes from California’s renowned vineyards: Zinfandel for its spicy nature, Syrah for its dark fruit flavors, bold Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot for a smooth finish.

Winemaker tasting notes;

The brambly spice of Zinfandel, dark fruit flavors of Syrah, the bold notes of Cabernet Sauvignon and the smooth elegance of Merlot unite to create this captivating red blend.

Apothic Red reveals intense fruit aromas and flavors of rhubarb and black cherry, complemented by hints of mocha, chocolate, brown spice and vanilla. The plush, velvety mouthfeel and the smooth finish round out this intriguing, full-bodied red blend.

13.1% Alcohol

Warm and Cozy with Trivento’s Amado Sur – Red Blends Continued..

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Warm and Cozy with Trivento’s

 2010 Amado Sur from Argentina

The luck of the red blends was with us again recently when I finally sat down to experience this delicious wine.  As I’ve asked before; can a wine make you feel warm and cozy? My answer is YES and for me the Amado Sur falls into this category.

I was drawn to this wine in our store because of its varietal blend; 80% Malbec, 10% Bonarda and 10% Syrah. Being a fan of all three led me to believe that I was going to enjoy their coming together and boy did I ever. I seem to not be the only one because it is flying off our shelves. I can take credit for a few bottles myself plus the happy returning customers that I have recommended Amado Sur to, but not the one to two cases we are going through weekly. So much so that we just ordered 10 cases for an end-cap display.  With the added benefit of a sale price and coupons we may just be ordering even more soon.

Trivento information from Banfi Importers: When in the mid-1990s Concha y Toro, Chile’s leading wine producer, announced its successful purchase a collection of vineyards (now accounting for 3,185 acres) in the Mendoza region of neighboring Argentina, there was little doubt on either side of the Andes that change was in the air. Wind is the agent of change, so it was only fitting that the new venture was named “ Trivento” (Three Winds), a whimsical reference to three winds that sweep through Mendoza and are such a distinguishing feature of the region’s climate and environment.

Upon decanting the first thing I noticed was its rich aroma which included; dark fruit, caramel and an undertone of wood.  As it breathed I also noted; black pepper, blackberry, black olive and oak on the nose.  Once poured its bright garnet color, more so along the edges of the glass, brought attention to the lovely slow-moving legs. Both of these I believe a cause of the wines alcohol level.  Additionally noted on the palate were; chocolate, a sweetening of the wine as it opened and what I listed as violet but in actuality may have been anise or licorice.

Winemaker notes: A deep red wine with dark blue tones and aromas of dark fruit combining with notes of black pepper, anise, cinnamon and chocolate. Lush flavors of plums and berries give way to velvety tannins and a persistent and pleasant finish.

We paired the Amado Sur with an aged cheddar cheese to start followed by pepperoni pizza. It worked very well with both, making the cheddar explode with flavor and the pizza even more spicy. I am looking forward to enjoying this wine again and again and even more so sharing it with family, friends and customers. ¡SALUD!

Price range: $12-17.00

Wine Spectator Review:

A floral red, with juicy blackberry, raspberry and plum notes supported by medium tannins, as the grippy finish unfolds with hints of mulled spice and licorice. Smart Buy. 90 Points.

Nathan Wesley – Wine Spectator – October, 2012

Qué Syrah Shiraz….??

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Hogue Cellars Genesis 2009 Syrah and Jacob’s Creek 2009 Shiraz back to back:

English: Clusters of Shiraz, or Syrah grapes. ...

English: Clusters of Shiraz, or Syrah grapes. Note the deep color of the berries. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Once again the Wine powers that be brought me two wines to enjoy this week. One from Australia [Jacob’s Creek] the other from our own Washington State [Genesis].  Interestingly both wines are from the same vintage,  are marketed at different price points and are from different continents; therefore the Syrah vs. Shiraz which is actually the same varietal.  First off let’s start with a little background;

Syrah is the primary (sometimes sole) grape variety used to make the famous red Rhône wines of Côte Rotie and Hermitage and also the component that gives backbone and structure to most Rhône blends, including Chateauneuf  du Pape. Although slow to cross the threshold of popular acceptance, syrah became one of California’s most planted varieties around the cusp of the millennial transition. In 1984, there were less than 100 acres, but by 2010, over 19,000 vineyard acres in the state were growing syrah.

Genesis 2009 Syrah – Columbia Valley

Price range: $12-20.00

Winemaker’s notes:

The Hogue family planted its first vineyard over 25 years ago and soon realized that Washington’s climate and soils had the potential to nurture world-class wines. The Hogue Cellars’ mission has always been to make wines that fulfill the promise of the land, using superior viticulture and winemaking techniques. Today, the family’s original vision is celebrated in Genesis wines, which are crafted with the highest quality fruit from acclaimed vineyards throughout Columbia Valley.

Washington Syrah exhibits dark, juicy fruit character, brilliant color, a complex varietal gaminess and a relatively low tannin level.

I luckily found this wine in our Winn-Dixie grocery store clearance rack; marked down from $16.00 to $7.99.  Priced perfectly for experimenting with a varietal I have not often had on its own.  That, plus the fact that I enjoy discovering Washington State wines.

My tasting notes:  Beautiful purple hue as it was decanted with black ripe fruit, violet, plum and casis on the nose.  Sleek slow legs draped themselves on my tasting chalice.  On the palate I noted the addition of cedar, tobacco, cocoa, vanilla and blackberry jam followed by a soft finish.  I had expected a fruit forward jammy tasting wine but this one in particular seemed overwhelmed by its time in wood.  Decanting and breathing never subsided the effect.  Because of this I would describe this wine as too woody for me. Unfortunately the fruitiness of the varietal got lost in the process.

Critical acclaim:

“Well made and muscular, this compact effort brings black fruit, black olive, black licorice and espresso flavors together in a balanced and strikingly complex Syrah. The blend includes small amounts of Cabernet, Lemberger, Sangiovese and Merlot – unusual but it works. Editors’ Choice” 90 Points Wine Enthusiast

Jacob’s Creek 2009 Shiraz

Price range; $5.99-$8.99

Winemaker Notes:

Lifted aroma of fresh Raspberry and Black Cherry, underpinned with a softly spiced background. Refined, mouth filling berry fruit flavours are supported with a soft acidity, leading to a long and flavoursome finish to the wine.

Vintage Conditions:
A cool and dry winter preceded the 2009 growing season. Dry conditions prevailed into spring and early summer requiring the implementation of  supplementary irrigation to maintain healthy and protective grapevine canopies. Early February temperatures were slightly cooler than average  in most regions, ideal for the gradual accumulation of essential grape sugars and flavours. Harvesting of Shiraz occurred in earlier than usual,
which was advantageous as March saw a record breaking heat wave strike most of South Eastern Australia.

My Tasting notes: 

On the nose; jammy, herbaceous [grass, bell pepper], fruity [ripe blackberry, fig, currant, raisin], eucalyptus, dried tobacco, licorice, oak and leather as it opened.  On the palate; powerful yet tight, not as fruity as I expected, needing to open but not really doing so as time passed. I noted some softening of the tannins at about 10 minutes but no difference at 30 minutes.

In conclusion I would have to say the Jacob’s Creek is a smoother, easier wine to drink. It offers a greater variety of tasting points for the drinker to enjoy compared to the Genesis where it is difficult to get beyond the strong wood scent and taste.  The fact that I paid $5.99 for the Jacob’s Creek is also a great selling point. I look forward to comparing it to others in the same price range [such as Yellowtail] and also look forward to trying Syrah’s from other areas of the world. Que Syrah, Shiraz!  ¡SALUD!

Varietal Aromas/Flavors: Processing Bouquets/Flavors:
FRUIT: black currant, blackberry TERROIR: musk, civet, truffle, earth
FLORAL: grass OAK (light): vanilla, coconut, sweet wood
SPICE: black pepper, licorice, clove, thyme, bay leaf OAK (heavy): oak, smoke, toast, tar
HERBAL: sandalwood, cedar BOTTLE AGE: cedar, cigar box, earth, leather